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SQL Server Management Studio 2005/2008 forgets password

This is why people bag on Microsoft.

SQL Server Management Studio 2005 forgets password

As does the 2008 version. I ran into this issue and was (not) surprised to find that the bug dating back to version 2005 had still not been fixed.  Hey, at least you can delete some files to fix it though.

Edit: Just to make it more clear, from Voot’s post in the link above, you need to go to C:\Documents and Settings\[USERNAME]\Application Data\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\100\Tools\Shell

and delete SqlStudio.bin.

Make sure SSMS is not running when you delete it. Fire up SSMS again. All your credentials will be gone, so you’ll need to reenter them, but it should remember them from here on out. I have no idea what causes it to initially mess up.

On another note, it’s not often you see a woman write something like the following (what can I say, there’s not that many women in my field):

It doesn’t take too long to set up a tool to monitor a file or directory – you can download FileMon from:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sysinternals/FileAndDisk/Filemon.mspx

The Connect to Server dialog can pop up in different situations where there is no security context for the connection to use. If you use registered servers (and save the password there) when you view the registered servers, select a server in the Registered Servers task pane and then click New Query on the toolbar or Right Click, Connect, Object Explorer or New Query which will result in connecting under the security context you used when registering the server. If a server isn’t selected, there is no security context available so the Connect to Server dialog pops up. I haven’t heard of passwords  being “lost” or “forgotten” using the registered servers task pane and saving registration information there.

Good info.


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Comments

9 Responses to “SQL Server Management Studio 2005/2008 forgets password”

  1. Scott says:

    You can fix the password rememberance problem by deleting file(s)?
    Are you serious?
    Becuase if you are, let me know – I’m sick of having to type the damn password in all the time!

  2. admin says:

    Yes, it’s pretty lame. For Sql Server 2008, you need to go to C:\Documents and Settings\[USERNAME]\Application Data\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\100\Tools\Shell

    and delete SqlStudio.bin.

    Make sure SSMS is not running when you delete it. Fire up SSMS again. It will have forgotten all your servers, so you’ll need to reenter them, but it should remember yous credentials. I have no idea what causes it to initially mess up.

  3. And Microsoft wonder why they got passed up by Apple. Microsoft IS the Kmart blue light special of software. I’ve been developing software for since age 16 and was published by age 18 … going on 30 years of software development … Microsoft wasn’t always this bad, their products started to spiral downwards around 2000.

    I know when I’m coding for Microsoft, as 50% of my time will be searching the internet for solutions to bugs. When I’m coding for OSX and variants, I spend less than 10% of my time searching for bugs. Pretty significant difference, and IMHO the very reason Microsoft will continue the spiral downwards … who knows, maybe Apple will toss 80 Million into Microsoft when they hit rock bottom … the irony.

  4. Steve Schmidt says:

    I had it working well with two servers that used the same userid/password combination, but it gets confused when you have to connect to a server using a different userid and/or password. It appears to override all passwords with the new one. Now I have to clear it out and start over (again!)

  5. FYI, deleting SqlStudio.bin is not a perminant solution, in fact it’s pretty temporary. It will “appear” to solve the problem initially after you’ve re-entered all your user/passwords for each server you connect to … BUT, within a month it was back to forgetting passwords again.

    I’m almost certain this is yet again another security context problem with the OS and SSMS – I would attribute most of the bugs found in Microsoft’s products (including OS) are directly related to a very poor job at implementing security.

    I still hope (and think it is necessary for the survival of Microsoft) that we’ll see a true NEW OS come out of Microsoft in the near near future. Backwards compatibility will NOT be maintained (can’t be as security and compatibility are in direct opposition) but VMWare could be included with the brand NEW OS. NEW = start from scratch — it really is the only way for Microsoft to survive.

  6. Steve Jobs says:

    I don’t think that this will work due to the fact that when you delete the file mentioned and re-enter the data it simply re-creates the SqlStudio.bin file.

  7. DaveH says:

    Does not work. A Registered server remembers passwords correctly. But if you are using the change connection in a query window and you have multiple logins for the same server you are changing to, the passwords will not be remembered properly. Why is there no “hot fix” for this?

  8. Chris H says:

    In my case on Vista it was located in

    C:\Users\[USERNAME]\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\100\Tools\Shell

    In any case thanks for posting this, it was very frustrating to have it randomly happen.

  9. ebook says:

    Thanks bro,
    This is what I’m looking for

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